Replication research in the social sciences

Cover of: Replication research in the social sciences |

Published by Sage Publications in Newbury Park .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Social sciences -- Research,
  • Social sciences -- Methodology,
  • Replication (Experimental design)

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementedited by James W. Neuliep.
ContributionsNeuliep, James William, 1957-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsH62 .R443 1991
The Physical Object
Pagination517 p. :
Number of Pages517
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1866474M
ISBN 100803940912, 0803940920
LC Control Number90024581

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Replication Research in the Social Sciences 1st Edition by James W. Neuliep (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book Cited by: Replication Research in the Social Sciences 1st Edition by James W.

Neuliep (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book Author: James W. Neuliep. / Clyde Hendrick --Replication research: a "must" for the scientific advancement of psychology / Yehuda Amir and Irit Sharon --Publications politics, experimenter bias and the replication process in social science research / Robert F.

Bornstein --Personal comment on replications / Stuart J. McKelvie --Editorial bias against replication research. social sciences (pp. Replication crisis - Wikipedia The replication of others research was.

social science research studies, A Digital Library for the Dissemination and Replication of. This book is essential reading for anyone conducting research in the social and behavioural sciences. No other volume offers researchers such concise. Across the medical and social sciences, new discussions about replication have led to transformations in research practice.

Sociologists, however, have been largely absent from these discussions. In social sciences, such as sociology, psychology, and economics, as well as linguistics, conducting replication research contributes to “the essence of the scientifi c method” involving.

Recently, a team of social scientists — spanning psychologists and economists — attempted to replicate 21 findings published in the most prestigious general science journals: Nature and.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Replication research in the social sciences. Corte Madera, CA: Select Press, (OCoLC) Document Type.

1 Replication in L2 research and other fi elds The interdisciplinary nature of SLA research Whereas the research area of SLA borrows certain methodologies and research principles from social sciences research, the role and, accordingly, the value of replication research in SLA has not been clearly defi ned to date for a number of Size: KB.

TESS funds research across the social sciences, so we are getting a much wider view of replication than in the Science study. Second, we were more focused on. Labour Economics is to be congratulated on its decision to stimulate the conduct of replication research in its field.

The process of replication is at the very heart of the scientific process, yet the social sciences have been slow to encourage the early and systematic replication of Cited by: 5. A Research Quandary.

Operating in a highly competitive publish or perish environment, new researchers are presented with a quandary here. Research Supervisors encourage the use of replication studies to both provide a valuable contribution of validation to science, and to expose their students to multiple research methodologies.

A companion website is available for this text!"This book provides an excellent balance between theory and practical application in social research. The book works well to develop students' understanding of particular methods of inquiry, embedding them within "real world" settings.

Replication research in the social sciences book envisage that it will help students to understand the nuances of particular approaches, the complimentarity of. Social Sciences Replication Project. About the Project. Why are we doing this. There has been an increasing interest in the predictors of reproducibility of research results, and how low reproducibility may inhibit efficient accumulation of knowledge.

We will replicate 21 experimental studies in the social sciences published in Nature and. The replication crisis (or replicability crisis or reproducibility crisis) is, as ofan ongoing methodological crisis in which it has been found that many scientific studies are difficult or impossible to replicate or replication crisis affects the social sciences and medicine most severely.

The crisis has long-standing roots; the phrase was coined in the early s as. Replication is a term referring to the repetition of a research study, generally with different situations and different subjects, to determine if the basic findings of the original study can be applied to other participants and circumstances.

Once a study has been conducted, researchers might be interested in determining if the results hold. “The effect in the replication is in the same direction as in the original study, and is statistically significant with a p-value smaller than For all studies listed below, the sample size for the first data collection - "n (first data collection)" - refers to having 90% power to detect 75% of.

Replication represents the deliberate or conscious repetition of research efforts, intended to confirm or extend previously or simultaneously obtained, but still uncertain, findings. Suggested Citation: "Duplication, Replication, and Complementarity." Institute of Medicine.

Research and Service Programs in the PHS: Challenges in. Across the medical and social sciences, new discussions about replication have led to transformations in research practice. Sociologists, however, have been largely absent from these discussions.

The goals of this review are to introduce sociologists to these developments, synthesize insights from science studies about replication in general, and detail the specific issues regarding. The recent “replication crisis” in the social sciences has led to increased attention on what statistically significant results entail.

There are many reasons for why false positive results may be published in the scientific literature, such as low statistical power and “researcher degrees of freedom” in the analysis (where researchers when testing a hypothesis more or less actively Cited by: 1.

“ Social Security and Private Saving,” Journal of Political Economy – Neuliep, James W., ed. Replication Research in the Social Sciences. Handbook of replication research in the behavioral and social sciences by,Select Press edition, in EnglishPages: Replication refers to researchers conducting a repeated study of a project that typically has been published in a peer-reviewed journal or book.

This is not the same, however, as duplication. All qualitative research hinges on the unique characteristics of people, locations. The Replication Crisis in Science. There have been two distinct responses to the replication crisis – by instituting measures like registered reports and by making data openly available.

This book is essential reading for anyone conducting research in the social and behavioural sciences. No other volume offers researchers such concise and authoritative information on replication and its importance in the furtherance of : James W.

Neuliep. A ddressing the immensely important topic of research credibility, Raymond Hubbard’s groundbreaking work proposes that we must treat such information with a healthy dose of skepticism. This book argues that the dominant model of knowledge procurement subscribed to in these areas—the significant difference paradigm—is philosophically suspect, methodologically impaired, and statistically.

The Archive Project: Archival Research in the Social Sciences builds on these questions, exploring key methodological ideas and debates and engaging in detail with a wide range of archival projects and practices, in order to put to use important theoretical ideas that shed light on the methods involved.

[MUSIC PLAYING] Gary King Discusses Replication in the Social Sciences GARY KING, PHD: Hi. I'm Gary King. I'm the Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor at Harvard University. I'm also Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science, also at Harvard.

What does it mean to be scientific and what is replication. What all this is about is what science is about. This book is designed to introduce doctoral and graduate students to the process of scientific research in the social sciences, business, education, public health, and related disciplines.

This book is based on my lecture materials developed over a decade of teaching the doctoral-level class on Research Methods at the University of South Florida. The target audience for this book includes Ph.D /5(34). The overall incidence of published replication studies in economics is minuscule – greater incentives are required Replication of government research uncovers shaky evidence on relationship between school and degree performance.

This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Unported.

Dismissing replication, they write, “indicates a value of novelty over truth and a serious misunderstanding of both science and creativity.” Legitimizing a Discipline “A lot of people have made much of the difference between the natural sciences and the social sciences,” Makel said.

“I do not associate science with a content area. Replication is an unparalleled tool for teaching students about the trials and tribulations of real world research – including all the shortcuts an author might have taken to get ‘that result’.

If enough students are exposed to this idea, some go on to become academics, editors and policy-makers themselves and are then in a position to. However, we should not forget that the need for replication studies in the biomedical, natural, and social sciences was established in large part because of failed attempts at by: 4.

The replication crisis has engulfed different branches of science, and the social sciences have been hit the hardest. Psychology and social psychology, in particular, have been swept under a spate of scandals and failures to replicate.

Whole theories that had been widely accepted as proven are being questioned and disputed (Priming, Ego Depletion). Fact, fiction, and social science replication A recent scandal will lead to calls for greater transparency in political science data.

But that's been an ongoing : Daniel Drezner. - Buy Using R for Data Analysis in Social Sciences: A Research Project-Oriented Approach book online at best prices in India on Read Using R for Data Analysis in Social Sciences: A Research Project-Oriented Approach book reviews & author details and more at Free delivery on qualified : Quan Li.

Kathy J. Kuipers, Stuart J. Hysom, in Laboratory Experiments in the Social Sciences (Second Edition), XII CONCLUSION. Conducting experimental research to test theories or construct theoretical explanations requires careful attention to all details from setting up the lab to developing procedures to implementing the experiment.

Published summary reports of experimental tests may lead to. This book is the outcome of the seminar entitled A Year Perspective on Replication, which was held at Monte Verità, Ascona, Switzerland, in November The book is organized in 13 self-contained chapters written by most of the people who have contributed to developing state-of.

In social sciences research, obtaining information relevant to the research problem generally entails specifying the type of evidence needed to test a theory, to evaluate a program, or to accurately describe and assess meaning related to an observable by: 4.

A replication crisis has been declared in certain social sciences, but even in more traditional experimental sciences, replicability sometimes turn out to be a problem. Academic publishing is an activity that is growing fast with more t peer reviewed journals publishing more.

[Excerpts taken from the article “A miracle cancer prevention and treatment? Not necessarily as the analysis of 26 articles by legendary Hans Eysenck shows” by Tomasz Witkowski and Maciej Zatonski, published in Science Based Medicine] “In May a report from an internal enquiry conducted by the King’s College London (KCL) was released.

A critical reason is the perception of lack of value; that is, investigators consider original research as more valuable than replication studies, resulting in less professional by: 2.On the other hand the coordination of replication of eukaryotic genomes and the interaction between duplication and the cell division cycle is still a matter of intense research and debate.

This special issue intends to demonstrate new developments and concepts in the general field of DNA replication and related topics, e.g. DNA repair.

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